Parent and Provider Resources

This page serves as a tool for parents and providers of children and adolescents to learn more about families and trauma and access available resources. If you need immediate help, please call your health provider or Lurie Children's at 1 800 543 7362. 

Click here for resources specifically addressing post-election mental health needs.


Remembering Trauma is a short film highlighting the life of a traumatized youth from his early childhood into older adolescence. The film illustrates the impact of complex trauma and the potential for misdiagnosis across various service systems. Remembering Trauma Part 2 incorporates scenes from the narrative Part 1 film, with poignant commentary from real world professionals who work across child-serving settings, including school, juvenile justice and mental health.


This short film features a highly diverse cast of seven adolescents and young adults who examine the shared and unique challenges faced, mistakes made, and growth attained in the struggle to transcend legacies of developmental trauma. It is an offering of collective wisdom, inspiration and hope for young people ensnared by adverse life experiences such as chronic neglect, violence, abuse, bullying, and exploitation from seven peers and mentors who came just before them and found their way through.  


When a child endures a traumatic experience, the whole family feels the impact, but adults hold the power to help lessen its effects. Several factors can change the course of kids’ lives: feeling seen and heard by a caring adult, being patiently taught coping strategies and resilience-building techniques, and being with adults who know about the effects of such experiences. HERE are ways to bring these factors to life.


The National Child Traumatic Stress Network has provided a list of resources for parents and providers in the aftermath of the recent shooting in Las Vegas, NV. The combination of traumatic personal experiences, violent images in the media, disruption of routines and expectations of daily life, and post-violence adversities pose psychological challenges to affected children and families. Restoring a sense of safety and security, and providing opportunities for normal development within the social, family and community context are important steps to helping children, adolescents, and families recover from traumatic experiences. 


In the wake of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Dr. Colleen Cicchetti, CCR Executive Director and pediatric psychologist at Lurie Children’s Hospital, sits down with WBEZ's Tony Sarabia and explains how adults should talk to children about traumatizing incidents in the news.    


How should you talk to your kids about violence they see on the news or social media? Colleen Cicchetti, PhD, and Tara Gill, PhD, are CCR team members and pediatric psychologists who specialize in trauma-informed care. In this discussion, they offer some insights on how to help kids cope with violent news and images.


Recently we've been hearing many concerns from schools and parents regarding the new Netflix series, “13 Reasons Why.” The show is based on the young adult novel 13 Reasons Why by Jay Asher, and portrays high school student Hannah Baker who makes 13 cassette tapes for the 13 people whom she believes are responsible for her death by suicide.  

Elyssa’sMission recommends that your school address this issue head-on. You should not only engage your students in discussion, but further inform your parent community about the hype surrounding the show, as well as how they can talk to their child about the important issues it brings to light. Click HERE to learn more and including a “sample letter” that you can modify accordingly and then send out to parents.


The Illinois Childhood Trauma Coalition (ICTC) is a voluntary collaboration of organizations that are committed to applying a trauma lens to their efforts on behalf of families and children in the state. Founded in 2005, the Coalition is made up of more than 80 public, private, clinical, research, advocacy and educational institutions. With a diversity of disciplines and perspectives, the Coalition tracks emerging trends, promotes education among professionals and the public, and offers support to a broad network of agencies that work with and for children and families who experience trauma. Learn more at LookThroughTheirEyes.org.


The National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) was established to improve access to care, treatment, and services for traumatized children and adolescents exposed to traumatic events.

For Parents: The NCTSN designed these pages for birth parents, adoptive parents, resource/foster parents, grandparents, caregivers, and all others who care for children and teens. Learn more The National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) was established to improve access to care, treatment, and services for traumatized children and adolescents exposed to traumatic events.The NCTSN designed these pages for birth parents, adoptive parents, resource/foster parents, grandparents, caregivers, and all others who care for children and teens. Learn more HERE.

Catastrophic Events: In response to the recent shootings in Orlando, the NCTSN has developed resources to help families and the community respond. The NCTSN also has resources on Psychological First Aid (PFA). PFA is an early intervention to support children, youth, adults, and families impacted by these types of events. Learn more HERE.